Why is color correction and touch ups important?

HAVE YOU EVER gotten a new slew of head shots and found yourself deeply disappointed in the results due to the images not showcasing you as spry as you thought you were? Perhaps the lighting was too warm, your pores were too exposed, you forgot powder and your face looks shiny or greasy.... but more frustrating is that when you print, they are much, much darker then what is illuminated on your screen. 

If the above have ever shown in your images, then you need to consider having your photos edited after every shoot. It is a part of the photography process, and the extra cost is usually extremely well worth it. 

Read below to understand why:


Color Correction:

The camera is drawn to grey, and depending on the light your in, it will record whatever is available to the nearest neutral. Color correction ensures that your whites become white, skin tones look healthy and warm, and blacks stay dark full of depth. 

I am an expert color corrector. I even teach students color correcting and I highly recommend reviewing my color correction/ touch up page for examples.

Image on the Left: Very blue, creating unnatural skin tones. Artistically, playing with white balance can be a style choice, but in the case of head shots, you want to personify someones real skin tones.     Image on the Right: Color corrected. The skin tones are natural and warm. The eyes are brighter and more engaging. Textures are more prominent. 

Image on the Left: Very blue, creating unnatural skin tones. Artistically, playing with white balance can be a style choice, but in the case of head shots, you want to personify someones real skin tones. 

Image on the Right: Color corrected. The skin tones are natural and warm. The eyes are brighter and more engaging. Textures are more prominent. 


Touch Ups:

A good camera will capture everything, including blemishes, hair out of place, and even caked make up. Touch ups can soften skin tones, reduce clarity, brighten eyes, and remove circles under eyes. I can even reduce wrinkles, or increase muscle tone. I can lighten shadows. If you wanted, I could even remodel your body and give you a mermaid tail. The point is, sometimes the camera catches the things you didn't want people to see the day of your shoot, and these little things can be distractions in your image. 

Image on Left: Overall Darker, conveying shadows along on the subjects face, skin blemishs, and low contrasting tones. 

Image on Right: Face is brighter, tones are richer, skin is smoother. 


Editing For The Printer: 

When a photographer takes a photo of you and playbacks the image at the shoot, whatever the screen shows you, is a lie. Once it is uploaded into the photo editing software to be showcased on the monitor, it is a lie. When you upload it to your Facebook page as a digital image, it is a LIE! 

Why? Why is this a lie? Because when you click print that image will be 30% darker, and especially depending on the printer. You must ABSOLUTELY, if nothing else from color correction and touch ups, you must have your images proof edited for print. This is the most difficult part of the editing process because if a photographer is unfamiliar with paper qualities, printer settings, and juxtaposing digital imaging to print, your beautiful head shots will never print the way you see them on the screen. 

And lets face it, you need to print them. It is an industry standard to supply a paper copy of your headshot and resume to nearly every audition you may be called for. And when they sit down at the end of the day, they use your headshot to reference you. It is important your shot looks exactly like you when you entered that room. It's main use at that moment in time is to jog someones memory of you. Let them remember the best of you.